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Baby Face Nelson

Baby Face Nelson PDF
Author: Steven Nickel
Publisher: Cumberland House Publishing
ISBN: 9781681626116
Size: 27.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 416
View: 6428

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Using new information that comes from the formerly classified files of the FBI, this book tells the full story of the remarkable criminal career of Baby Face Nelson. Illustrations.

Baby Face Nelson

Baby Face Nelson PDF
Author: Steven Nickel
Publisher: Cumberland House
ISBN: 9781581826821
Size: 39.37 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 432
View: 791

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Baby Face Nelson examines the paradoxical and interesting figure of Lester Joseph Gillis aka Baby Face Nelson. With new, formerly classified information from the FBI, the book recounts the life of a public enemy who became addicted to crime in his youth and intoxicated with violence near the end of his life.

American Outlaws

American Outlaws PDF
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781986038126
Size: 65.31 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 52
View: 6784

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*Comprehensively covers Baby Face Nelson's most notorious shootouts and robberies, his relationship with John Dillinger, and the fatal Battle of Barrington. *Includes pictures of Baby Face Nelson and important people and places in his life. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. "He had a baby face. He was good looking, hardly more than a boy, had dark hair and was wearing a gray topcoat and a brown felt hat, turned down brim." -The wife of Chicago Mayor Big Bill Thompson describing the man who attacked her and stole her jewelry in October 1930. America has always preferred heroes who weren't clean cut, an informal ode to the rugged individualism and pioneering spirit that defined the nation in previous centuries. The early 19th century saw the glorification of frontier folk heroes like Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone. After the Civil War, the outlaws of the West were more popular than the marshals, with Jesse James and Billy the Kid finding their way into dime novels. And at the height of the Great Depression in the 1930s, there were the "public enemies," common criminals and cold blooded murderers elevated to the level of folk heroes by a public frustrated with their own inability to make a living honestly. The man who became Public Enemy Number One after the deaths of John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd was Lester Joseph Gillis, whose alias "George Nelson" eventually gave way to the nickname "Baby Face Nelson." Despite the almost playfully innocent nickname, and the fact that he was not as notorious as two of his partners in crime, Dillinger and Floyd, Baby Face Nelson was the worst of them all. In an era where the outlaws were glorified as Robin Hood types, Baby Face was a merciless outlier who pulled triggers almost as fast as he lost his temper. By the time fate caught up with Baby Face Nelson in November 1934 at the "Battle of Barrington," a shootout that left his body riddled with nearly 20 bullet holes, he was believed to have been responsible for the deaths of more FBI agents than anybody else in American history. It was a distinction he would have appreciated; during one bank robbery, Baby Face Nelson gleefully screamed "I got one!" after shooting police officer Hale Keith several times. Due to his association with Dillinger and his own crime spree, Baby Face Nelson became a fixture of pop culture and was the main character in a few Hollywood films two decades after his death. Though he is not remembered as colorfully as Dillinger or Bonnie and Clyde, he is often remembered paradoxically as being a devoted family man who even had his wife and children on the run with him. American Outlaws: The Life and Legacy of Baby Face Nelson looks at the life and crime of the famous outlaw, but it also humanizes him and examines his lasting legacy. Along with pictures of Baby Face Nelson and important people, places, and events in his life, you will learn about the infamous public enemy like you never have before, in no time at all.

Baby Face Nelson

Baby Face Nelson PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 22.35 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 352

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The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) within the U.S. Department of Justice presents FBI case documents regarding American bank robber George Nelson (1908-1934), also known as Baby Face Nelson, in PDF format. The case file is provided as part of the FBI's Freedom of Information Privacy Acts (FOIPA) Web site.

Baby Face Nelson

Baby Face Nelson PDF
Author: Filiquarian Pub. Llc
Publisher: Filibust
ISBN: 9781599862415
Size: 73.29 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 228
View: 6053

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Baby Face Nelson: The FBI Files contains the actual original and declassified criminal investigation files related to Baby Face Nelson. The Federal Bureau of Investigations created these documents as a part of an investigation into the 1934 robbery of the Peoples Savings Bank in Grand Haven, Michigan. This publication is being published and made available now for the first time in a paperback book edition for those interested in the history of Baby Face Nelson (aka Lester Joseph Gillis, aka George Nelson) and also for those who enjoy reading about historical American bank robbers.

Public Enemies

Public Enemies PDF
Author: Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781542465465
Size: 68.21 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 172
View: 7098

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*Covers the lives, crimes, and deaths of the Public Enemies. *Explains the legends and myths surrounding all of the public enemies in an attempt to separate fact from fiction. *Includes pictures of important people, places, and events. *Includes Bibliographies for further reading. America has always preferred heroes who weren't clean cut, an informal ode to the rugged individualism and pioneering spirit that defined the nation in previous centuries. The early 19th century saw the glorification of frontier folk heroes like Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone. After the Civil War, the outlaws of the West were more popular than the marshals, with Jesse James and Billy the Kid finding their way into dime novels. And at the height of the Great Depression in the 1930s, there were the "public enemies," common criminals and cold blooded murderers elevated to the level of folk heroes by a public frustrated with their own inability to make a living honestly. In 1933, the Chicago Crime Commission designated the first Public Enemy, and the most famous of them all. Despite his organized crime spree during the '20s, Al Capone was a popular figure in Chicago, viewed by many as a Robin Hood because he took pains to make charitable donations to the city. At the same time, he bribed government officials and cops, ensuring they looked the other way despite his violent ways of doing business. Throughout the decade, Capone was often out in public, despite several attempts on his life, and the gang war between Al Capone and Bugs Moran was well known and even celebrated to an extent. Even to this day, Chicago's gangster past is viewed as part of the city's lore, and tours of the most famous spots in Chicago's gang history are available across the city. Eventually, J. Edgar Hoover's FBI appropriated the term "Public Enemy" and applied it to outlaws like John Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson, and Bonnie and Clyde. Two months after Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration in 1933, a petty thief who had spent almost a decade behind bars for attempted theft and aggravated assault was released from jail. By the end of the year, that man, John Dillinger, would be America's most famous outlaw: Public Enemy Number One. From the time of his first documented heist in early July 1933, until his dramatic death in late July of the following year, he would capture the nation's attention and imagination as had no other outlaw since Jesse James. The man who became Public Enemy Number One after the deaths of John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd was Baby Face Nelson, who ran with Dillinger in 1934. Baby Face was a merciless outlier who pulled triggers almost as fast as he lost his temper. By the time fate caught up with Baby Face Nelson in November 1934 at the "Battle of Barrington," a shootout that left his body riddled with nearly 20 bullet holes, he was believed to have been responsible for the deaths of more FBI agents than anybody else in American history. There was no shortage of well known public enemies like John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson, but none fascinated the American public as much as Bonnie and Clyde. While the duo and their Barrow Gang were no more murderous than other outlaws of the era, the duo's romantic relationship and the discovery of photographs at one of their hideouts added a more human dimension to Bonnie and Clyde, even as they were gunning down civilians and cops alike. When Bonnie and Clyde were finally cornered and killed in a controversial encounter with police, a fate they shared with many other outlaws of the period, their reputations were cemented. Public Enemies chronicles the lives, legends, and legacies of America's most famous public enemies. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about Capone, Dillinger, Baby Face, and Bonnie & Clyde like never before.

Leading The Dillinger Gang The Lives And Legacies Of John Dillinger And Baby Face Nelson

Leading the Dillinger Gang  the Lives and Legacies of John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson PDF
Author: Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781492988946
Size: 31.29 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 52
View: 7338

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*Comprehensively covers the two outlaws' most notorious shootouts and robberies, their relationship, and their deaths. *Includes pictures of Dillinger, Baby Face Nelson and important people and places in their lives. *Includes a Bibliography for further reading. "I will be the meanest bastard you ever saw when I get out of here." - John Dillinger "He had a baby face. He was good looking, hardly more than a boy, had dark hair and was wearing a gray topcoat and a brown felt hat, turned down brim." -The wife of Chicago Mayor Big Bill Thompson describing the man who attacked her and stole her jewelry in October 1930. America has always preferred heroes who weren't clean cut, an informal ode to the rugged individualism and pioneering spirit that defined the nation in previous centuries. The early 19th century saw the glorification of frontier folk heroes like Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone. After the Civil War, the outlaws of the West were more popular than the marshals, with Jesse James and Billy the Kid finding their way into dime novels. And at the height of the Great Depression in the 1930s, there were the "public enemies," common criminals and cold blooded murderers elevated to the level of folk heroes by a public frustrated with their own inability to make a living honestly. Two months after Franklin D. Roosevelt's inauguration in 1933, a petty thief who had spent almost a decade behind bars for attempted theft and aggravated assault was released from jail. By the end of the year, that man, John Dillinger, would be America's most famous outlaw: Public Enemy Number One. From the time of his first documented heist in early July 1933, until his dramatic death in late July of the following year, he would capture the nation's attention and imagination as had no other outlaw since Jesse James. America saw in Dillinger what it wanted to see, and even his death seemed scripted for Hollywood. The man who became Public Enemy Number One after the deaths of John Dillinger and Pretty Boy Floyd was Lester Joseph Gillis, whose alias "George Nelson" eventually gave way to the nickname "Baby Face Nelson." Despite the almost playfully innocent nickname, and the fact that he was not as notorious as two of his partners in crime, Dillinger and Floyd, Baby Face Nelson was the worst of them all. In an era where the outlaws were glorified as Robin Hood types, Baby Face was a merciless outlier who pulled triggers almost as fast as he lost his temper. By the time fate caught up with Baby Face Nelson in November 1934 at the "Battle of Barrington," a shootout that left his body riddled with nearly 20 bullet holes, he was believed to have been responsible for the deaths of more FBI agents than anybody else in American history. It was a distinction he would have appreciated; during one bank robbery, Baby Face Nelson gleefully screamed "I got one!" after shooting police officer Hale Keith several times. Due to his association with Dillinger and his own crime spree, Baby Face Nelson became a fixture of pop culture and was the main character in a few Hollywood films two decades after his death. Though he is not remembered as colorfully as Dillinger or Bonnie and Clyde, he is often remembered paradoxically as being a devoted family man who even had his wife and children on the run with him. Leading the Dillinger Gang looks at the lives and crimes of the two outlaws, including their time together running the Dillinger gang, and it also analyzes their legacies. Along with pictures of the outlaws and important people, places, and events in their lives, you will learn about Dillinger and Baby Face like never before.

American Outlaws

American Outlaws PDF
Author: Source Wikipedia
Publisher: University-Press.org
ISBN: 9781230637549
Size: 62.73 MB
Format: PDF
Category :
Languages : en
Pages : 104
View: 2041

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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 102. Chapters: Bonnie and Clyde, John Dillinger, W. D. Jones, Baby Face Nelson, Butch Cassidy, James-Younger Gang, Colton Harris-Moore, Black Bart, Procopio, John Ashley, Reno Gang, Robert Ford, Joaquin Murrieta, Cora Hubbard, Crawford Goldsby, Belle Starr, Dalton Gang, Cole Younger, Thomas Egenton Hogg, Jack Powers, Mason Henry Gang, Sundance Kid, Nathaniel Reed, Brushy Bill Roberts, Sile Doty, Henry Berry Lowrie, Quantrill's Raiders, John Murrell, Salomon Pico, Rube Burrow, James Copeland, Herman Lamm, Gregorio Cortez, Dick Liddil, Edward Capehart O'Kelley, Archie Clement, John Mason, Joseph "Mad Dog" Taborsky, Ralph Fults, Loomis Gang, Harpe brothers, John Younger, L.H. Musgrove, Clell Miller, Bob Younger, Jim Younger, Rufus Henry Ingram, Peter Alston, Tom McCauley, Earl Durand, Jack Kennedy, John Callahan, Jack Gordon, Five Joaquins, James Clark, Thomas Bell Poole, Captain Ingram's Partisan Rangers, Daniel Boone May, Bummers Gang. Excerpt: Bonnie Elizabeth Parker (October 1, 1910 - May 23, 1934) and Clyde Chestnut Barrow (March 24, 1909 - May 23, 1934) were well-known outlaws, robbers, and criminals who traveled the Central United States with their gang during the Great Depression. Their exploits captured the attention of the American public during the "public enemy era" between 1931 and 1934. Though known today for his dozen-or-so bank robberies, Barrow in fact preferred to rob small stores or rural gas stations. The gang is believed to have killed at least nine police officers and committed several civilian murders. The couple themselves were eventually ambushed and killed in Louisiana by law officers. Their reputation was cemented in American pop folklore by Arthur Penn's 1967 film Bonnie and Clyde. Even during their lifetimes, the couple's depiction in the press was at considerable odds with the hardscrabble reality...