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From Camelot To Kent State

From Camelot to Kent State PDF
Author: Joan Morrison
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195144538
Size: 38.64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 355
View: 7576

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No decade in American history continues to fascinate us like the Sixties. No decade combines such hopeful idealism with such violence and disillusionment, or witnesses such profound political, cultural, and personal upheavals. And no decade benefits more from being seen through the eyes of those who experienced firsthand the shocks and revelations that still reverberate today. Newly revised and updated, with an expanded introduction, From Camelot to Kent State tells the story of ten of the most dramatic years in the life of America-and of fifty-nine men and women who lived through those years. In their own words, civil rights activists, soldiers who fought in Vietnam, anti-war protesters, student radicals, feminists, Peace Corps workers, and many others take us inside the major events and movements of the period. Far from a dispassionate history of the Sixties, these stories bristle with the tension and immediacy of lived experience. How did it feel to wake up into step out of a helicopter into a Vietnamese jungle; to ride south on a freedom bus, to march on the Pentagon; to take over a college administration building; to hear Jimi Hendrix play the national anthem at Woodstock; to attend the first consciousness-raising meetings for women at the Bread and Roses cafe? This captivating oral history will let you know. Included are first-hand accounts from both the famous-including Eldridge Cleaver, Abbie Hoffman, Philip Berrigan, and John Lewis-and the ordinary men and women who were swept up in major historical events, From Camelot to Kent State offers a uniquely valuable view of a decade that forever changed the history and consciousness of America. "

From Camelot To Kent State

From Camelot to Kent State PDF
Author: Joan Morrison
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198033001
Size: 32.51 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 380
View: 3312

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No decade in American history continues to fascinate us like the Sixties. No decade combines such hopeful idealism with such violence and disillusionment, or witnesses such profound political, cultural, and personal upheavals. And no decade benefits more from being seen through the eyes of those who experienced firsthand the shocks and revelations that still reverberate today. Newly revised and updated, with an expanded introduction, From Camelot to Kent State tells the story of ten of the most dramatic years in the life of America-and of fifty-nine men and women who lived through those years. In their own words, civil rights activists, soldiers who fought in Vietnam, anti-war protesters, student radicals, feminists, Peace Corps workers, and many others take us inside the major events and movements of the period. Far from a dispassionate history of the Sixties, these stories bristle with the tension and immediacy of lived experience. How did it feel to wake up into step out of a helicopter into a Vietnamese jungle; to ride south on a freedom bus, to march on the Pentagon; to take over a college administration building; to hear Jimi Hendrix play the national anthem at Woodstock; to attend the first consciousness-raising meetings for women at the Bread and Roses café? This captivating oral history will let you know. Included are first-hand accounts from both the famous-including Eldridge Cleaver, Abbie Hoffman, Philip Berrigan, and John Lewis-and the ordinary men and women who were swept up in major historical events, From Camelot to Kent State offers a uniquely valuable view of a decade that forever changed the history and consciousness of America.

The Hippies

The Hippies PDF
Author: John Anthony Moretta
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786499494
Size: 26.76 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 428
View: 2643

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"In this exemplary treatise on the vast reaches and deep roots of a defining movement, Moretta offers a probing and potent work of cultural anthropology that captures the essence of the youthful energy that changed a nation and influenced the world""--Booklist "This balanced consideration of the hippies succeeds in incorporating positive and negative assessments of this slice of the counterculture of the 1960s...fine study. Highly recommended"--Choice "Impressively informative and thoroughly 'reader friendly' in organization and presentation...very highly recommended"--Midwest Book Review Among the most significant subcultures in modern U.S. history, the hippies had a far-reaching impact. Their influence essentially defined the 1960s--hippie antifashion, divergent music, dropout politics and "make love not war" philosophy extended to virtually every corner of the world and remain influential. The political and cultural institutions that the hippies challenged, or abandoned, mainly prevailed. Yet the nonviolent, egalitarian hippie principles led an era of civic protest that brought an end to the Vietnam War. Their enduring impact was the creation of a 1960s frame of reference among millions of baby boomers, whose attitudes and aspirations continue to reflect the hip ethos of their youth.

The 1960s Cultural Revolution A Reference Guide 2nd Edition

The 1960s Cultural Revolution  A Reference Guide  2nd Edition PDF
Author: John C. McWilliams
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1440863644
Size: 55.13 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 265
View: 3848

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The 1960s Cultural Revolution is a highly readable and valuable resource revisiting personalities and events that sparked the cultural revolutions that have become synonymous with the 1960s. The 1960s Cultural Revolution: A Reference Guide is an engagingly written book that considers the forces that shaped the 1960s and made it the unique era that it was. An introductory historical overview provides context and puts the decade in perspective. With a focus on social and cultural history, subsequent chapters focus on the New Left, the antiwar movement, the counterculture, and 1968, a year that stands alone in American history. The book also includes a wealth of reference material, a comprehensive timeline of events, biographical profiles of key players, primary documents that enhance the significance of the social, political, and cultural climate, a glossary of key terms, and a carefully selected annotated bibliography of print and nonprint sources for further study. Offers an accessible overview of the 1960s cultural revolution that uniquely brings together narrative, biographies, primary source materials, and analysis Shares a new perspective on an era that is part of the core curriculum of U.S. history Provides context essential to appreciating the interests, ideas, and individuals responsible for shaping the cultural revolution of the 1960s Acts as a research guide for high school and undergraduate students Includes an annotated bibliography of print and online primary and secondary sources to encourage further study

Battleground Chicago

Battleground Chicago PDF
Author: Frank Kusch
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226465039
Size: 12.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 206
View: 3850

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The 1968 Democratic Convention, best known for police brutality against demonstrators, has been relegated to a dark place in American historical memory. Battleground Chicago ventures beyond the stereotypical image of rioting protestors and violent cops to reevaluate exactly how—and why—the police attacked antiwar activists at the convention. Working from interviews with eighty former Chicago police officers who were on the scene, Frank Kusch uncovers the other side of the story of ’68, deepening our understanding of a turbulent decade. “Frank Kusch’s compelling account of the clash between Mayor Richard Daley’s men in blue and anti-war rebels reveals why the 1960s was such a painful era for many Americans. . . . to his great credit, [Kusch] allows ‘the pigs’ to speak up for themselves.”—Michael Kazin “Kusch’s history of white Chicago policemen and the 1968 Democratic National Convention is a solid addition to a growing literature on the cultural sensibility and political perspective of the conservative white working class in the last third of the twentieth century.”—David Farber, Journal of American History

The Rise And Fall Of The New Deal Order 1930 1980

The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order  1930 1980 PDF
Author: Steve Fraser
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691216258
Size: 75.65 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
View: 5774

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The description for this book, The Rise and Fall of the New Deal Order, 1930-1980, will be forthcoming.

Witness To The Revolution

Witness to the Revolution PDF
Author: Clara Bingham
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679644741
Size: 30.88 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 656
View: 1401

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The electrifying story of the turbulent year when the sixties ended and America teetered on the edge of revolution NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH As the 1960s drew to a close, the United States was coming apart at the seams. From August 1969 to August 1970, the nation witnessed nine thousand protests and eighty-four acts of arson or bombings at schools across the country. It was the year of the My Lai massacre investigation, the Cambodia invasion, Woodstock, and the Moratorium to End the War. The American death toll in Vietnam was approaching fifty thousand, and the ascendant counterculture was challenging nearly every aspect of American society. Witness to the Revolution, Clara Bingham’s unique oral history of that tumultuous time, unveils anew that moment when America careened to the brink of a civil war at home, as it fought a long, futile war abroad. Woven together from one hundred original interviews, Witness to the Revolution provides a firsthand narrative of that period of upheaval in the words of those closest to the action—the activists, organizers, radicals, and resisters who manned the barricades of what Students for a Democratic Society leader Tom Hayden called “the Great Refusal.” We meet Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn of the Weather Underground; Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department employee who released the Pentagon Papers; feminist theorist Robin Morgan; actor and activist Jane Fonda; and many others whose powerful personal stories capture the essence of an era. We witness how the killing of four students at Kent State turned a straitlaced social worker into a hippie, how the civil rights movement gave birth to the women’s movement, and how opposition to the war in Vietnam turned college students into prisoners, veterans into peace marchers, and intellectuals into bombers. With lessons that can be applied to our time, Witness to the Revolution is more than just a record of the death throes of the Age of Aquarius. Today, when America is once again enmeshed in racial turmoil, extended wars overseas, and distrust of the government, the insights contained in this book are more relevant than ever. Praise for Witness to the Revolution “Especially for younger generations who didn’t live through it, Witness to the Revolution is a valuable and entertaining primer on a moment in American history the likes of which we may never see again.”—Bryan Burrough, The Wall Street Journal “A rich tapestry of a volatile period in American history.”—Time “A gripping oral history of the centrifugal social forces tearing America apart at the end of the ’60s . . . This is rousing reportage from the front lines of US history.”—O: The Oprah Magazine “The familiar voices and the unfamiliar ones are woven together with documents to make this a surprisingly powerful and moving book.”—New York Times Book Review “[An] Enthralling and brilliant chronology of the period between August 1969 and September 1970.”—Buffalo News “[Bingham] captures the essence of these fourteen months through the words of movement organizers, vets, students, draft resisters, journalists, musicians, government agents, writers, and others. . . . This oral history will enable readers to see that era in a new light and with fresh sympathy for the motivations of those involved. While Bingham’s is one of many retrospective looks at that period, it is one of the most immediate and personal.”—Booklist

Viva Kennedy

Viva Kennedy PDF
Author: Ignacio M. García
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 9781603447324
Size: 15.90 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Electronic books
Languages : en
Pages : 227
View: 3339

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For a few brief months during the presidential campaign of 1960, Mexican Americans caught a glimpse of their own Camelot in the promise of John F. Kennedy. Grassroots "Viva Kennedy Clubs" sprang up not only in the southwestern United States but also across California and the upper Midwest to help elect the young Catholic standard bearer. The leaders of the Viva Kennedy Clubs were confident and hopeful that their participation in American democracy would mark the beginning of the end of discrimination, violence, and poverty in the barrio. Although the dream of attaching their own Camelot to Kennedy's ultimately ended in disappointment, these participatory efforts contributed to an identity-building process for Mexican Americans that led to greater emphasis on Americanization for some and to the more radical rhetoric of the Chicano Movement for others. In "Viva Kennedy," Ignacio M. Garcia surveys the background, development, and evolution of the Viva Kennedy Clubs and their post-election incarnation as PASO, the Political Association of Spanish-Speaking Organizations. He argues that patriotic fervor of the 1940s and postwar economic expansion spurred middle-class Mexican Americans to strive for full inclusion in American society. Ironically, those involved in the Viva Kennedy movement showed their militancy in fighting discrimination even as they upheld America's conservative values. They believed that discrimination could be overcome through government actions that recognized their civil rights and through their own political participation. Garcia describes the post-election problems of the Viva Kennedy reformers, who first saw the Kennedy administration ignore its campaign promises to them and then encountered their own factional squabbles, chronic funding problems, and a growing unease among Anglo Americans wary of Mexican American political power. Based on research and interviews with key leaders of the Viva Kennedy movement such as Ed Idar, Jr., Edward R. Roybal, and Albert Pena, Jr., this study unveils a portrait of a people in transition and provides a nuanced picture of twentieth-century Mexican American history.

An Interracial Movement Of The Poor

An Interracial Movement of the Poor PDF
Author: Jennifer Frost
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814728680
Size: 78.56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 257
View: 5223

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Choice Outstanding Academic Title 2002 Community organizing became an integral part of the activist repertoire of the New Left in the 1960s. Students for a Democratic Society, the organization that came to be seen as synonymous with the white New Left, began community organizing in 1963, hoping to build an interracial movement of the poor through which to demand social and political change. SDS sought nothing less than to abolish poverty and extend democratic participation in America. Over the next five years, organizers established a strong presence in numerous low-income, racially diverse urban neighborhoods in Chicago, Cleveland, Newark, and Boston, as well as other cities. Rejecting the strategies of the old left and labor movement and inspired by the Civil Rights Movement, activists sought to combine a number of single issues into a broader, more powerful coalition. Organizers never limited themselves to today's simple dichotomies of race vs. class or of identity politics vs. economic inequality. They actively synthesized emerging identity politics with class and coalition politics and with a drive for a more participatory welfare state, treating these diverse political approaches as inextricably intertwined. While common wisdom holds that the New Left rejected all state involvement as cooptative at best, Jennifer Frost traces the ways in which New Left and community activists did in fact put forward a prescriptive, even visionary, alternative to the welfare state. After Students for a Democratic Society and its community organizing unit, the Economic Research and Action Project, disbanded, New Left and community participants went on to apply their strategies and goals to the welfare rights, women’s liberation, and the antiwar movements. In her study of activism before the age of identity politics, Frost has given us the first full-fledged history of what was arguably the most innovative community organizing campaign in post-war American history.

The New Winter Soldiers

The New Winter Soldiers PDF
Author: Richard R. Moser
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813522425
Size: 78.52 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 219
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Interviews with veterans document opposition by soldiers to the Vietnam War

Disarmed And Dangerous

Disarmed And Dangerous PDF
Author: Murray Polner
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429980604
Size: 59.38 MB
Format: PDF
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 468
View: 1072

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What transformed Daniel and Philip Berrigan from conventional Roman Catholic priests into ?holy outlaws??for a time the two most wanted men of J. Edgar Hoover's FBI? And how did they evolve from their traditionally pious, second-generation immigrant beginnings to become the most famous (some would say notorious) religious rebels of their day?Disarmed and Dangerous, the first full-length unauthorized biography of the Berrigans, answers these questions with an incisive and illuminating account of their rise to prominence as civil rights and antiwar activists. It also traces the brothers' careers as constant thorns in the side of church authority as well as their leadership of the ongoing Plowshares movement?a highly controversial campaign of civil disobedience against the contemporary arms trade and nuclear weapons.Murray Polner and Jim O'Grady plumb the Berrigans' contradictions: among them, Philip's secret marriage, while he was still a Josephite priest, to Elizabeth McAlister, then a Catholic nun, which led to their dismissals by their respective religious orders and Philip's excommunication from the church; and Daniel's speech faulting Israel's treatment of Palestinians, and the resulting criticism loosed upon him from pro-Israeli Americans and many of his allies on the left.Disarmed and Dangerous is a fascinating study of brothers linked by faith and the dreams of peace and social justice in a century bloodied by war, mass murders, and weapons of immense destructive power. It is, above all, an original contribution to modern American history that is sure to be widely read and discussed.

Berkeley At War The 1960s

Berkeley at War   The 1960s PDF
Author: W.J. Rorabaugh Professor of History University of Washington
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198022522
Size: 26.64 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 328
View: 2721

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Berkeley, California, was the bellwether of the political, social, and cultural upheaval that made the 1960s a unique period of American history--a time when the top-down methods of a conservative establishment collided head-on with the bottom-up, grass-roots ethos of the civil rights movement and an increasingly well-educated and individualistic middle class. W.J. Rorabaugh, who attended the graduate school of the University of California at Berkeley in the early 1970s, presents a lively and informative account of the events that overtook and changed forever what had once been a quiet, conservative white suburb. The rise of the Free Speech Movement, which gave a voice to disfranchised students; the growth and increasing militance of a black community struggling to end segregation; the emergence of radicalism and the anti-war movement; the blossoming of "hippie" culture, with its scorn for materialism and enthusiasm for experimentation with everything from sex and drugs to Eastern philosophies; the beginnings of modern-day feminism and environmentalism--and how all of these coalesced in the explosive conflict over People's Park--are traced in a meticulously researched and authoritative narrative. At issue was the question of power, and the struggle between the establishment and the powerless led to developments that the advocates of a freer society could scarcely have foreseen: Ronald Reagan, elected governor of California in reaction to the events at Berkeley, and Edwin H. Meese III, who battled against the student movement and People's Park, rose to national power in the 1980s (without, however, gaining any popularity in Berkeley, where Walter Mondale won 83 percent of the vote in 1984). An invaluable account of its time and place, this book anchors the '60s in American history, both before and since that colorful decade.

Advertising In The 60s

Advertising in the 60s PDF
Author: Hazel G. Warlaumont
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN:
Size: 48.41 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 244
View: 1669

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The 1960s provides Warlaumont with the backdrop for examining the struggle of advertising during the anti-establishment movement in one of America's most colorful but turbulent decades. Under fire from the counterculture, social critics, the government, and consumers, advertising surprisingly made history with its strategies for survival and its unprecedented creativity.

Locating Memory

Locating Memory PDF
Author: Annette Kuhn
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782381996
Size: 57.59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Photography
Languages : en
Pages : 300
View: 1605

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As a visual medium, the photograph has many culturally resonant properties that it shares with no other medium. These essays develop innovative cultural strategies for reading, re-reading and re-using photographs, as well as for (re)creating photographs and other artworks and evoke varied sites of memory in contemporary landscapes: from sites of war and other violence through the lost places of indigenous peoples to the once-familiar everyday places of home, family, neighborhood and community. Paying close attention to the settings in which such photographs are made and used--family collections, public archives, museums, newspapers, art galleries--the contributors consider how meanings in photographs may be shifted, challenged and renewed over time and for different purposes--from historical inquiry to quests for personal, familial, ethnic and national identity.

Humanities

Humanities PDF
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 60.12 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : Education, Humanistic
Languages : en
Pages :
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Vietnam S Prodigal Heroes

Vietnam s Prodigal Heroes PDF
Author: Paul Benedikt Glatz
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 179361671X
Size: 14.19 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 412
View: 4831

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Vietnam’s Prodigal Heroes examines the critical role of desertion in the international Vietnam War debate. Paul Benedikt Glatz traces American deserters’ odyssey of exile and activism in Europe, Japan, and North America to demonstrate how their speaking out and unprecedented levels of desertion in the US military changed the traditional image of the deserter.